WWE

Compared to the other Halls of Fame that we discuss on our website, this one is hands down the most fun and the hardest to calculate. Keep in mind, that there is no actual WWE Hall of Fame where fans can go and see their heroes. There are no set criteria to get in the WWE Hall of Fame. Wins and losses don’t exactly matter when the matches are predetermined. It does not even seem to matter if you even wrestled for the WWE as some of their inductees never drew a paycheck from Stamford. This is as subjective as they come so with that we made a criteria of our own which did incorporate (in no particular order) impact, ability, innovation championships won, legacy and their use in the WWE. The only rule we set was that the wrestler in question was not currently an active competitor on a full time basis.

Until Then, Whatcha gonna do when Notinhalloffame.com runs wild on you!
 
Sincerely,
 
The Not in Hall of Committee.
With all due respect to Iron Mike Sharpe (whom we love by the way) when Gene Kiniski was billed as Canada’s Greatest Athlete it seemed far more legitimate.  The former NWA World Heavyweight Champion looked every bit the tough guy and far from anyone you would want to pick a fight with.
From the University of Oklahoma, “Dr. Death” Steve Williams was a legitimate athlete who excelled in both amateur wrestling and on the gridiron.  He adapted very quickly and his matches were a showcase of skill, brute force and unequalled intensity.
If the WWE Hall of Fame is truly going to go old school with their Hall of Fame than so are we!
In WCW, “The Natural” Dustin Rhodes rose up through the ranks to be a dependable upper card babyface.  He may have been the son of WCW booker Dusty Rhodes, but his place on the card was established by skill as evidenced by the fans not turning on him, like they did with Eric Watts later.  Despite his position on the…
First off, how the hell did TNA Wrestling start a Hall of Fame WITHOUT Jeff Jarrett as the first inductee? That aside, with the way Jeff Jarrett left the WWE (he held them up for a quarter of a million when his contract ran while still the IC Champ), the WWE Hall of Fame seems like a long shot.
(“Beautiful” Bobby Eaton, “Sweet” Stan Lane & “Loverboy” Dennis Condrey)Despite the temptation, this entry will focus on the tag team and not the entire package that featured the dynamic Jim Cornette.
More often than not if you ask people who the greatest Native American wrestler, more often than not the answer is Chief Jay Strongbow.  With Strongbow played by an Italian American that answer never seemed right to us.  Sometimes the answer would be Jack Briscoe though since he never wrestled with a “stereotypical Native” gimmick, his name does not come…
His WWE exposure was limited to a tag team match at Wrestlemania VII and a pair of Royal Rumble appearances but in Japan, there are few held in higher regard than Genichiro Tenyru.  Through cross promotions with the WWE, he had chances to face many of their stars in Japan with his formation of the SWS promotion.  Tenyru would later…
A graduate of Larry Sharpe’s “Monster Factory”, no other graduate fit the bill of a monster better than “The Beast from the East”, Bam Bam Bigelow.  He was a large man (nearly 400 lbs) and though he wasn’t the first of his size in the business, he was the first to debut such incredible agility.
Having the distinction of being the first man to regain the first recognized version of the World Heavyweight Championship, Joe Stecher also was one of the youngest, winning his first of three world titles at the age of 22.  Stecher, who was always in the shadow of Frank Gotch, never had the dream match with the retired former champion but…
We could have ranked Billy Gunn on his own.  As one half of the Smoking Gunns, the Billy & Chuck tandem, and an up and down solo career post DX, he could have garnered a top 200 spot.  We also could have ranked the Road Dogg as a single as he had a lengthy career without Gunn.  Clearly we chose…
With the discussion of the late Brian Pillman it is as if you remember two different wrestlers.  The first was the aerial specialist who was one of the first American wrestlers to successfully adopt a high flying style that could match any Japanese performer or Luchadore spot for spot.  The second was the psychotic heel character who blurred the lines…
It is easy to say that because he had access to Ted Turner’s resources he was able to mount an offensive against the WWE. Just because you have the resources doesn’t mean you know what to do with it.
Many times, wrestling promoters talk of someone who has the “look” of a wrestler.  Looking back in the past twenty five years or so, it seems difficult to find anyone who had the designation more than Sid Eudy.
The man who is probably the greatest American Amateur Wrestler of the 1950’s (and arguably among the greatest five of all-time), Danny Hodge was able to generate a very successful professional career. He would become one of the premier Junior Heavyweights of the National Wrestling Alliance, and would hold that title on eight occasions. On top of winning titles, he…
Only in Professional Wrestling could the most known German competitor not actually be German.  Many wrestlers cashed in on the image of the evil Nazi that still resonated from the Second World War, but only James Raschke drew money with it, which was quite ironic considering his All American background.
This one was actually our hardest to rank.  Mitsuharu Misawa has been called by many to be the best wrestler that Japanese wrestler of his time; which is saying a lot!  The problem is that he never set foot in a WWE ring, nor had he real exposure to North America, which has to be considered a factor for a…
Don Leo Jonathan may have been born and raised in Utah but it was in Canada that he found his home.  Jonathan’s size and wrestling acumen allowed him to become a true international superstar and he traveled the world winning titles and headlining cards.  As mentioned he was most comfortable in Canada and it was for the NWA in Vancouver…
Although he would receive mention on WWF and WWE broadcasts through the years for his innovation and popularity, Edouard Carpentier never has seemed to be a serious contender for the WWE Hall of Fame. Carpentier won the NWA World Heavyweight Championship in 1957, though the falling out with his promoter and the NWA led to a splintering of the championship.
The first half of Kevin Sullivan’s in ring career was solid, but fairly non-descript.  He was lean and muscular and was often in the mid card or in tag teams of which ever promotion he worked.  In his mid thirties, Sullivan’s career did an about face with the advent of a devil worshiper gimmick that had never been done before.