Displaying items by tag: San Francisco 49ers
Last month, regular contributor, Spheniscus and I debated the Hall of Fame merits of those who were on the Baseball Hall of Fame ballot.

Now that the Baseball Hall of Fame Class of 2016 has announced their class has done the same.  We were hopeful to do this prior to the announcement of the actual inductees, but life, as it often does simply got in the way!

Saying that, we felt it was worth our time to take a look at the 2016 Nominees and debate whether they should have gotten in (or not) and look to the future of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Chairman:  Generally, we don’t rank owners on our lists, and there is one basic reason for it.  It’s boring.

Spheniscus, I don’t claim to know much about Edward DeBartolo Jr., the former owner of the San Francisco 49ers beyond a few basic things.  In the twenty-three years he owned the team, they were one of the elite franchises in the NFL and under his watch, they won five Super Bowls. 

He has been a finalist for the past three years and sure enough he got in, to the surprise of not a whole hell of a lot of people and to the fanfare of nobody out of the Bay Area.

The Niners were clearly not better off for him being forced out, and on fan blogs I have seen, he appears to be missed as the owner of the team.

That seems like the only things we need to know right as to why he got in right?

Spheniscus: Isn’t he really the original Robert Kraft? Took over a moribund franchise. Found a transcendent quarterback, hired a transcendent coach, and went on a run that was unmatched for sustained excellence until the Patriots came along in the 2000s.

Then after winning again with a new legendary quarterback he gets forced out and the Niners, with the small resurgence of a couple of years ago, have been largely terrible ever since.
If that is not a sign if greatness as an owner, I’m not sure what is. I’m not really sure how else we could measure it.

Chairman:  By that measurement he should have been a lock years agoi, but if Kraft follows his path, does that mean some incompetent relatives are going to force him out and the Pats are going to revert to 1970 levels of suckitude?

Possibly with the Super Bowl being in San Francisco would give the locals something to cheer for after losing half of their team to retirement and overall apathy.

The more I think about it, he should have gotten in a couple of years ago.

Spheniscus: The 1970s Pats weren’t terrible (I’m told, seeing as I wasn’t there). The roughing the passer call on Ray “Sugar Bear” Hamilton against the Raiders in 1976 Divisional Playoffs in is still talked about around here like Raiders fans talk about the Tuck Rule. This is the play, call it yourself…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1dWZKiiekmc

But I understand what you are saying. We just have to hope that Brady is still good for the next seven years. Or that Jimmy G is the next Steve Young.

But back to DeBartolo… looking at it, I think that it will likely be his year as well. Particularly with only an up or down vote necessary. They just started this contributor spot a few years ago and the backlog is so great, I doubt they are going to give a down vote this early in the process. And I think he deserves it.




Does anyone want to play defence for the San Francisco 49ers this year?



Following the retirement of Patrick Willis, a possible Hall of Fame contender, five time Pro Bowl selection, Justin Smith also announced that he will not be returning to the Niners and has elected to retire citing his inability to compete at 100 percent.

The Defensive End entered the NFL with the Cincinnati Bengals where he played his first seven seasons but it was with San Francisco, the team he signed as a free agent in 2008 where his career would reach its greatest heights. 

Smith would make five consecutive Pro Bowls (2009-13) and was a First Team All Pro in 2011.  Smith was also named the San Francisco 49ers MVP in 2008 and 2011 and Sports Illustrated named him their Defensive Player of the Year.

Justin Smith retires with 87 Quarterback Sacks and started 211 and 214 Games.
The Pro Football Hall of Fame has announced that Eddie DeBartolo Jr. has been announced as the contributor nominee for the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

DeBartolo Jr. is the former owner of the San Francisco 49ers and is regarded as the grand architect for the Niners past success.  He owned the franchise for a twenty-three year period and oversaw an organization that won five Super Bowls in that time frame. 

Under the new format, Contributor nominees are automatically forwarded to the Final round.  Last year, there were two Contributor nominees (Bill Polian and Ron Wolf), both of whom were inducted to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.  Debartolo Jr. has been a Hall of Fame semi-finalist in the past

As you can imagine, we here at Notinhalloffame.com will be keeping a close eye on who will be inducted in to the next Pro Football Hall of Fame Class.





Today it was announced by Wide Receiver, Brandon Lloyd, who last played with the San Francisco 49ers last season will retire. 

The Kansas City native and product of the University of Illinois began his career with the 49ers who drafted him in the 4th Round of the 2003 Draft.  Lloyd would be productive but was traded to the Washington Redskins where he would wind up in the doghouse of Head Coach Joe Gibbs, who rarely played him, especially in the 2007 where he would catch two passes. 

Considered damaged goods by many, Lloyd would sign with the Bears and put up a good season to where he was signed the following year with the Denver Broncos in 2010 and it was at Mile High that he would have his best season in the NFL.  Lloyd would catch 77 passes for an NFL leading 1,448 Yards and earn Pro Bowl and Second Team All Pro Selections.  2011 and 2012 would see him close to 1,000 Yards with Denver/St. Louis and New England respectively but injuries would catch up and he would sit out the 2013 season before trying a comeback with the 49ers last season, though that campaign would not result in numbers that he had posted before.

Overall, Brandon Lloyd finishes his career with 5,989 Yards Receiving with 36 Touchdowns.  These may not be Canton numbers, but still indicative of an above average career in the NFL.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com wish Brandon Lloyd the best on his post career efforts. 



8. Terrell Owens

Hands down, this has to be the most interesting player on this list to seek entry into Canton is Terrell Owens.

Statistically speaking, T.O. has the resume. As of this writing, he is number two in Receiving Yards, third in Receiving Touchdowns and sixth in receptions. He had seasons as a dominating player, earning five First Team All Pro nods and six Pro Bowls, and in his lone Super Bowl appearance he was a beast with 122 Yards despite coming off a horse collar tackle injury. That’s what should put him in; now here is what could keep him out.

11. Roger Craig

A very strong case can be made to justify the induction of Roger Craig to the Football Hall of Fame.  This makes it all the more bizarre that the powerful Running Back had to wait ten years to even get nominated.

There could be no doubt that during his prime that Roger Craig was an integral part of every offensive play.  Craig initially was a fullback in the pro ranks, but it became clear that he was equally adept at carrying the ball as blocking for others.  In 1986 he became the first football player to both rush and catch for 1,000 yards each.  Opposing defenses feared his high knee running style and had to keep all eyes on Craig during every play.

18. Isaac Bruce

Like ranking Torry Holt, we found the slotting of Isaac Bruce to be difficult. One of the main weapons on the Rams “Greatest Show on Turf”, Issac Bruce would collect 15,028 Receiving Yards which as of this writing is fourth all time. That is a very impressive number, but what puts him lower on our list is that he was never really considered the best player in his position, was never a First Team All Pro and was only in the top ten in Receiving Yards four times. That may all be true, but unlike Baseball, Football players are not viewed as stat compilers and he does have career numbers that are Canton worthy. If he got in on his first year of eligibility we wouldn’t be surprised. We would say the same if it took him ten tries.

24. John Brodie

When you think of great San Francisco quarterbacks you would automatically think of Joe Montana and Steve Young.  Prior to them there was a very good one named John Brodie who put up great numbers without the supporting cast that Montana and Young had.

John Brodie was one of the games early gunslingers and most of the time he had to be.  The 49ers of the 1960’s were not a great team, and Brodie was often the main reason his team was competitive. By the time the 70’s rolled around, Brodie had a better team around him and though he was finally playoff bound, the Niners could not get past the Cowboys for three years in a row.  Still, Brodie won the 1970 MVP and was given a more respect around the league.

49. Ricky Watters

You never had to wonder what was on Ricky Watters mind.  He would tell you whether it was good or bad, and that brashness made him a very polarizing figure in the NFL.  It is also possible that this is why the Hall of Fame has yet to look his way.

Ricky Watters was one of the most consistent Running Backs in the National Football League.  He gained 1,000 yards on the ground seven times while catching fifty passes five times.  Watters was the player that teams went to when they wanted to move the chains.  With that said, he was far from a darling of the press and it has been speculated that this could be a factor that could keep him out of the Hall of Fame.