1. Todd Helton

For a five year period, Todd Helton was not just the best player for the Colorado Rockies but was one of the best players in the game. “The Toddfather” had a five seasons where he never batted below .325, hit lower than 40 Home Runs, recieved MVP Votes and had an OPS less than one. Helton would also win four Silver Sluggers and three Gold Gloves. His 2000 Season would see him win the Batting, On Base Percentage and Slugging Title.

Todd Helton

While Larry Walker struggled to get into the Hall of Fame, fellow Colorado Rockie, Todd Helton should have an easier path. The five time All Star was a multi time Silver Slugger winner and Gold Glove recipient and from the period of 1999 to 2004 was one of the best offensive players in the game scoring an OPS over 1.0 five straight years as well as eclipsing the .300, 30 Home Run and 100 RBI mark.

Helton would compete his entire career with the Colorado Rockies and would retire as the franchise leader in multiple major offensive categories. Stat wise, Helton has the career numbers to be considered a Baseball Hall of Famer and probably will be. The question is how long will they make him wait.
We here at Notinhalloffame.com have continued our expansion of our Baseball section with a look at those who will be eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2019. 

The following players will be the eligible for the Hall of Fame in 2019:

Andy Pettitte

Barry Zito

Brad Penny

Darren Oliver

Derek Lowe

Freddy Garcia

Jake Westbrook

Jason Bay

Jon Garland

Jose Contreras

Juan Pierre

Kevin Youkilis

Lance Berkman

Mariano Rivera

Michael Young

Miguel Tejada

Octavio Dotel

Placido Polanco

Rafael Furcal

Ramon Hernandez

Roy Halladay

Roy Oswalt

Ryan Dempster

Ted Lilly

Todd Helton

Travis Hafner

Vernon Wells

Yorvit Torrealba

A few things certainly stand out from this group.

Mariano Rivera, who without question is the greatest relief pitcher of all time is expected to enter the Baseball Hall of Fame on his first ballot. 

Roy Halladay, a two time Cy Young Award winner is also a huge name on the ballot, and conceivable the eight time All Star could also join Rivera on the first ballot. 

For our money, the most interesting name on the ballot is Todd Helton, who for a five year period was one of the top offensive players in the National League and has accumulatively put together a Hall of Fame resume.  Will the Coors Field bias affect him as it did Larry Walker?

Andy Pettitte is another intriguing candidate as his stats put him on the fence, but his admitted (though contrite) PED use could place him on the wrong side of the vote.

The third “Killer B”, Lance Berkman should also get a decent percentage of the vote.

Beyond those five, it is difficult to imagine anyone else making the second year of eligibility, though didn’t many peg Miguel Tejada as a strong contender once upon a time?

For what it is worth, there is also a healthy contingent of former World Series Champions from the Boston Red Sox and the St. Louis Cardinals.

Gang, you know what we want you to do!

Take a look at the new entries and cast your vote and offer us your opinion.

As always, we here at Notinhalloffame.com thank you for your support and we will continue to provide updates as often as possible.







Slow and steady wins the race?

Ok, maybe we are trying to justify the slow pace of getting our Top 50 players of each franchise up, but we do have another one, and yes it is a return to the diamond.

As we are doing all of the franchises by random, the Colorado Rockies are up next, because…why…well, why not?

An expansion team in 1993, the Rockies have only made the playoffs three times, going as far as representing the National League in the World Series in 2007, though they were systematically destroyed in a four game sweep by the Boston Red Sox.

Casual fans still think the ball launches out of Coors Field (humidors have taken care of that) but that was the case in the 90’s and offense was a premium for the Rockies. 

Perhaps this is why so many of those on this list are from the 90’s!

The entire list can be found here, but as per tradition we always unveil the top five in our news item which are as follows:

  1. Todd Helton
  2. Larry Walker
  3. Troy Tulowitzki
  4. Carlos Gonzalez
  5. Nolan Aranedo
As always, we look forward to your feedback and look for us to unveil a new top 50 soon.
You know how hard it is to get into the Baseball Hall of Fame? In 2013, with a ballot brimming with qualified candidates, not one player received the 75 percent of the votes needed for admission. (I identified 14 likely Hall of Famers on the 2013 ballot.)

Granted, 2013 was the first year of eligibility for Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens, both poster boys for performance-enhancing drugs (PED), bringing to a head the contentious debate about "cheaters" and their admission into the Hall. But there were certainly several "clean" players on that ballot, and a few of those, such as 3000-hit-club member Craig Biggio, would have been uncontroversial picks in any previous year.

And although 2014 saw the election of three players—Tom Glavine, Greg Maddux, and Frank Thomas—it was merely the tip of a talent-heavy iceberg (I identified 18 likely Hall of Famers for that ballot), while providing a burn to Biggio yet again as not only did he miss election by one vote (he garnered 74.8 percent of the vote), but three first-time candidates leapfrogged him into Cooperstown.
Baseball immortality: Precious few attain it, most do not even come close—and some perch on the cusp of that immortality as signified by the Baseball Hall of Fame. Theirs are the test cases, players whose careers, accomplishments, and legacies form the threshold of what separates a Hall of Famer from the rest.

Baseball Hall of Fame voting in the last few years has been fascinating for a number of reasons, particularly the logjam of qualified candidates, which promises to remain an issue for the next few years. That logjam puts additional pressure on the borderline candidates—will they be overlooked, perhaps unfairly, because there are too many candidates from which to choose?
We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.
We here at Notinhalloffame.com thought it would be fun to take a look at the major awards in North American team sports and see how it translates into Hall of Fame potential.

Needless to say, different awards in different sports yield hall of fame potential.  In basketball, the team sport with the least amount of players on a roster, the dividend for greatness much higher.  In baseball, it is not as much as a great individual season does not have the same impact.

We are now taking a look at the Gold Glove Award, given annually to the best defensive player in MLB in each respective position.