2. Jason Kidd

An exceptionally versatile Point Guard, Jason Kidd took the New Jersey Nets to two consecutive NBA Finals, and though he did not win, he was able to taste the championship with a lesser role with the Dallas Mavericks in 2011. Kidd was not just a machine in regards to his Assists, but his defensive skills made him one of the most valuable players on the court and a perennial MVP candidate.

15. Buck Williams

One of the great power forwards of all-time, Buck Williams was a blue collar player who excelled under the boards.  A solid low post scorer, Williams is best remembered for his ability to rebound and defend.  Although not as flashy as some of his generation, his long career is a testament to hard work.  Tenth all time in games played and one of only seven players to score 16,000 points and grab 13,000 rebounds, Williams never played on a championship team but was a huge part of some very successful teams.  More importantly he played the game the way it was supposed to be played and always showed up for battle.

43. Sam Cassell

Sam Cassell may never have been the best player on any team he was on, but didn’t it always seem that as soon as he got to a team, they got better? Cassell was a great locker room guy, a good leader, an efficient passer and a feisty defender. He is the only player in NBA history to play over ten years and win a championship in his first and last campaign. Yet, when you play for eight different squads and only appear on one All Star Team (and again was never the go to player), is he really a Hall of Famer? Probably not, but didn’t you want him on your team?

59. Otis Birdsong

One of the best shooters ever, Otis Birdsong could flat out score. A great scorer at the University of Houston, Birdsong became one of the great shooting guards in the NBA in the early 1980’s with both the Kings and the Nets averaging 18 points a game for his career.  Being a four time All-Star helps his case but low career totals (just over 12,000 points) hurts.

90. Michael Ray Richardson

Michael Ray Richardson could very well be the Dave Parker of basketball.  Michael Ray had all the talent in the world and was well on his way to a Hall of Fame career but cocaine got in the way.  When drafted out of tiny Montana with the fourth pick of the 1978 draft he was hailed as the next Walt Frazier as he had those kinds of offensive and defensive skills; and he did not disappoint.  He became the first player ever to lead the league in assists and steals in his second season and the Garden faithful loved him.  However, he was traded to Golden State as compensation for the signing of Bernard King.  Richardson would then be quickly dealt back to the East Coast where he was sent to New Jersey.  He led the Nets to one of the biggest upsets in NBA history in 1984 when they shocked the defending champion, Philadelphia 76ers.  Things soon unraveled after that and Michael Ray was out of the league by 1986 with a lifetime ban.  A four time All-Star and two time All Defensive First Team selection, Michael Ray had the talent to be an all time great.  Sadly, drugs got in the way.