Prior to becoming a superstar and MVP in Colorado, Larry Walker was a very good player with the Montreal Expos who would become the only Canadian to win the franchise’s MVP award.  Walker would make an All Star Game, and win two Gold Gloves and one Silver Slugger as an Expo. 
Last year, we did our first ever debate on Notinhalloffame.com where we tackled the Hall of Fame merit of twenty-four men who are on the Hall of Fame ballot, in what was in our opinion the most loaded ballot in our lifetime.

Since it was so much fun last time, we thought we would do it again!

One thing that has not changed is the number.  We will again debate twenty-four men who are on the ballot.

What has changed are the ones debating.  Last year I had the pleasure of having DDT, the curator of DDT’s Pop Flies blog and D.K. of the Phillies Archivist blog.  This year, Spheniscus, who has participated in past Rock and Roll discussions, will be joining me.



Chairman: When you talk about Bonds, Clemens, Sosa and McGwire and the Baseball Hall of Fame the first thing that comes to mind is PEDs.  It is a heavy yoke for sure, but I don’t think it is nearly as heavy as the one that Larry Walker has, Coors Field.

Baseball fans know that Coors Field has been using a humidor in the past thirteen years to help neutralize the affect and numbers show that it has been working, but that happened in 2002, when Walker had already been playing for seven seasons so you do have to take into account what he did there. 

Saying that, let’s look at what he did (during his Rockies tenure) on the road.

Larry Walker had a Slash Line of .280/.385/.514 playing outside of Colorado.  That’s pretty good right?  Some would even say Hall of Fame good.  What hurts him every time is when that is compared to his home stats of .384/.464/.715, which is an astronomical gap. 

You know, sometimes I wonder if Walker had the same road numbers and had numbers around .330/.420/.550 at home, I honestly think his vote percentage would be a lot higher that the 11.8% he got last year.

Spheniscus: Remember how I said that Tim Raines was hurt by playing in Montreal? Well Walker’s candidacy probably would be bolstered if he had stayed in Montreal longer.

When the Red Sox played the Cardinals in the 2004 World Series, Walker had just been traded there and Joe Buck called him a future Hall of Famer. That was the first time that it had occurred to me that he actually had a case. Why? Part of it was his numbers and part was what happened to the other Rockies best players of the 90s when they went to other teams.  

Vinny Castilla went from being a mid .310s hitter to a .260s hitter (except for the one year he was back in Colorado in 2004). Dante Bichette? He went from hitting .340 in Colorado to making Red Sox fans pine for the good old days of Jack Clark. Hell, even Mike Kingery hit almost .350 there in 1994. Mike Kingery! Only the Big Cat, Andres Galarraga, seemed to be close to the same hitter out of Colorado that he was in Colorado. And he ended up with 4.1% of the vote the one year he was on the ballot.

So is Walker a Hall of Famer? The numbers say that he probably is. But it depends on what you think about the numbers. It’s funny actually, because you are right. If he were a worse player at home he’d probably be in the Hall. Unfortunately for him, he was too good for his own good. I think he may have an issue getting in, particularly with the 10 year limit now in place.


Chairman:  It is completely true.  Walker isn’t getting in and we all know why, and you are right.  He is being penalized for being too good!

Going back to Montreal, let’s say that strike doesn’t happen and the Expos, who at the time were the best team in baseball, go to the playoffs and win and Walker is a star there, possibly allowing the Expos more money to keep him?

Chances are with the dollar exchange the Expos couldn’t have afforded him anyway, but doesn’t it feel that if he signed as a free agent with any other team and had the same home stats he did in Montreal are we debating this today?  At the very least, he would have a higher percentage of votes yet have weaker statistics.  How insane is this?

I am reading about writers who are changing their minds about Bonds and Clemens but not Walker who had the misfortune of playing for the right team at the right time when the league hadn’t yet adapted to the Coors advantage. 

This is giving me a headache.

Spheniscus: If only he had known that doing worse for his home fans would be such a benefit to his legacy. Or that he should have invested in a humidor company. He would have made a killing.

It’s funny, when we started this he was the 15th guy on my list. Since then, he has moved up to #10. So my opinion has certainly changed with more research into this. Given that the writers gave him 11.8% of votes last year, where do you think he ends up this year? Does Griffey being on the ballot hurt him?

Chairman:  I don’t think Griffey’s appearance on the ballot makes much a difference to our Canadian baseball hero.  There are a lot of people who had their mind made up about him with Coors, but there are some voters where he might move up a spot or two with the ballot being slightly thinner than last year.

He does however have my vote, and I will predict 15%.

Spheniscus: 15% seems about right, but if he actually went down a little it wouldn’t surprise me either. And yes, he’d have my vote Coors Field or not.

2. Larry Walker

Already a proven commodity as a Montreal Expo, Canadian, Larry Walker certainly found Coors Field to his liking.  Walker would explode in 1997, winning the National League MVP Award, the Home Run Title, while boasting a Slash Line of .366/.452/720.  Not only did Larry Walker consistently hit over  .300 with Colorado, he had four seasons where he batted over.350!  Not surprisingly, this resulted in three batting titles, and with his excellent power numbers he would also have five seasons over 1.000 in OPS.  Helton may be ranked higher for his overall play and lengthy tenure in Denver, but the best pure hitter that Colorado had has to be Larry Walker.
While the Baseball Hall of Fame Ballot for this year was already known, it is worth noting that the names on the ballot have been made official and have been sent out to prospective voters.

Let’s go through the ballot and take a quick look shall we?

The new headliner is Ken Griffey Jr., who is expected by many (including us) to enter immediately.  He holds the “1C” rank on our Notinhalloffame.com baseball list.  It is worth noting that the ineligible Pete Rose and “Shoeless” Joe Jackson hold “1A” and “1B” respectively.

Griffey is not the only major star making his debut on the ballot, though he is the only one we think will get in immediately.  Closer, Trevor Hoffman and Outfielder, Jim Edmonds are also on the ballot for the first time.  Hoffman is second overall in Saves, and Edmonds is a former Silver Slugger and multi-time Gold Glove Winner, and they are ranked #47 and #44 on our Notinhalloffame.com baseball list respectively.

Billy Wagner, Garret Anderson, Troy Glaus, Mike Sweeney, David Eckstein and Mike Hampton are also intriguing candidates who could possibly gain a few votes on their debut ballot, but are not likely to get past this year.

Brad Ausmus, Luis Castillo, Mark Grudzielanek, Jason Kendall, Mike Lowell and Randy Winn are also on the ballot, but are not expected to get any votes.

This group joins the following holdovers from last year’s ballot, which are:

Mike Piazza, (69.9%, 4th Year) Ranked #4 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jeff Bagwell, (55.7%, 6th Year) Ranked #5 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Tim Raines, (55.0%, 9th Year) Ranked #7 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Curt Schilling, (39.2%, 4th Year) Ranked #9 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Roger Clemens, (37.5%, 4th Year) Ranked #2 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Barry Bonds, (36.8%, 4th Year) Ranked #3 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Lee Smith, (30.2%, 14th Year) Ranked #30 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Edgar Martinez, (27.0%, 7th Year) Ranked #16 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Alan Trammell, (25.1%, 15th Year) Ranked #13 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mike Mussina, (24.6% 3rd Year) Ranked #6 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jeff Kent, (14.0 %, 3rd Year) Ranked #45 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Fred McGriff, (12.9%, 7th Year) Ranked #29 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Larry Walker, (11.8%, 6th Year) Ranked #15 on Notinhalloffame.com

Gary Sheffield, (11.7%, 2nd Year) Ranked #19 on Notinhalloffame.com

Mark McGwire (10.0%, 10th Year) Ranked #12 on Notinhalloffame.com

Sammy Sosa, (6.6%, 4th Year) Ranked #18 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Nomar Garciaparra, (5.5%, 2nd Year) Unranked on Notinhalloffame.com.



As they have reduced the time on the ballot from fifteen years to ten, this will be McGwire’s last crack it.

Lee Smith and Alan Trammell were grandfathered under the previous rule, but this is also Trammell’s last shot as he is entering his fifteenth year on the ballot.

Who do you think will be the class that will be inducted next summer in Cooperstown?

We know this much, debates on who should get in will dominate the sports blogs and countless opinions will be given…including ours!

Our favorite day here at Notinhalloffame.com is always when the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame announces their annual Classes.  Our second day is when they announce their Baseball Hall of Fame Class.

That second day is here.

The Baseball Hall of Fame Class of 2017 has been announced and let’s get right to it as we have three new Baseball Hall of Famers

The highest vote getter this year is Jeff Bagwell who is selected on his 7th year of eligibility.  Bagwell received 86.2% of the vote, well up from his 71.6% last year.  It has been believed that his delay into getting into the Baseball Hall has been due to PED suspicion, but that is all there was in his case. 

Finishing second on the ballot is Tim Raines, who was on his last year of eligibility.  “Rock” had 86.0% and like Bagwell received a more than 15% jump.  For many Baseball fans, this is long overdue and many are thrilled to see him get his due.

Perhaps a bit of a surprise is that Ivan Rodriguez entered on his first ballot with 76.0%.  Statistically, I-Rod is Cooperstown worthy but he has a direct PED accusation from Jose Canseco though was never named in the Mitchell Report.

Overall, the PED users/suspected players have seen a rise in the totals, a lot of which can be attributed with the elimination of older and inactive baseball writers from the process and the induction of Bud Selig, who presided over the time that PED use arose in the game.

Let’s look at those who didn’t make the cut:


Trevor Hoffman: 2nd Year on the ballot, 74.0%

The prolific reliever did not make this year, but he was only a handful of votes away.  He finished with 67.3% last year and should get in next year. 

Vladimir Guerrero: 1st Year on the ballot, 71.7%

“Vlad the Impaler” was pegged by some as a first ballot inductee but it won’t take him long to get in.  He should be a lock next year.

Edgar Martinez: 8th Year on the ballot, 58.6%

Edgar has only two years left but this was a huge jump from the 43.4% he had last year.  Martinez was a Designated Hitter, a position that has hurt him in the past and the fact that three people got in to help thin the ballot somewhat does not hurt his cause.

Roger Clemens: 5th Year on the ballot, 54.1%

This was a huge jump for Clemens and the first time he eclipsed 50 percent.  This is up 8.9% from last year and perhaps for the first time we have a strong reason to think that the Rocket could get in. 

Barry Bonds: 5th Year on the ballot, 53.8%

See above.  Could we see in the future a year where both Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens enters Cooperstown together?  A few years ago we wouldn’t have thought so, but now that seems like a possibility.

Mike Mussina: 4th Year on the ballot, 51.8%

Mussina doesn’t get a lot of attention as he is not a controversial choice, nor is he one that plays to the media.  He did however jump up past the 50% mark for the first time and is going in the right direction.

Curt Schilling: 5th Year on the ballot, 45.0%

Schilling dropped 7 percent, and we all know why don’t we?  He angered the media with his comments toward them and is this backlash was long expected.

Lee Smith: 15th Year on the ballot, 34.2 %

This is the end for Smith, who at one point was the all-time Saves leader.  Based on how he was trending, he was lucky to make it this far.

Manny Ramirez: 1st Year on the ballot, 23.8 %

This could be the biggest surprise.  The suspected PED users went up, but Ramirez was caught and suspended twice.  Maybe the writers thought “Manny being Manny” was not enough explanation.

Larry Walker:  7th Year on the ballot, 21.9%

While it doesn’t look like Walker will get in, he did jump up from his 15.5% from last year.

Fred McGriff:  7th Year on the ballot, 21.7%.

McGriff barely budged from his 20.9% from last year.  It isn’t looking good for the “Crime Dog.”

Jeff Kent: 3rd Year on the ballot, 16.7%

The former National League MVP moved up…0.1%.  Is there a Survivor Hall of Fame?

Gary Sheffield:  3rd Year on the ballot, 13.3%

Sheffield mildly improved but he on such a crowded ballot, he still has time to jump up considering his career stats.

Billy Wagner: 2nd Year on the ballot, 10.2%

Wagner actually went down from his 10.5% from the year before.  Realistically, just staying on the ballot is a win for him.

Sammy Sosa:  5th Year on the ballot, 8.6%

Sosa is still alive, so we are stuck debating him another year.

The notable player who did not make the 5% to stay on the ballot was former New York Yankee Catcher, Jorge Posada, received 3.8%.

Others who received votes were Magglio Ordonez (0.7%), Edgar Renteria (0.5%), Jason Varitek (0.5%) and Tim Wakefield (0.2%).

The others on the ballot who did not receive any votes were Corey Blake, Pat Burrell, Orlando Cabrera, Mike Cameron, J.D. Drew, Carlos Guillen, Derrek Lee, Melvin Mora, Arthur Rhodes, Freddy Sanchez and Matt Stairs.

We here at Notinhalloffame.com would like to congratulate the latest Baseball Hall of Fame Class and we will be unveiling our next list in a month’s time.





Slow and steady wins the race?

Ok, maybe we are trying to justify the slow pace of getting our Top 50 players of each franchise up, but we do have another one, and yes it is a return to the diamond.

As we are doing all of the franchises by random, the Colorado Rockies are up next, because…why…well, why not?

An expansion team in 1993, the Rockies have only made the playoffs three times, going as far as representing the National League in the World Series in 2007, though they were systematically destroyed in a four game sweep by the Boston Red Sox.

Casual fans still think the ball launches out of Coors Field (humidors have taken care of that) but that was the case in the 90’s and offense was a premium for the Rockies. 

Perhaps this is why so many of those on this list are from the 90’s!

The entire list can be found here, but as per tradition we always unveil the top five in our news item which are as follows:

  1. Todd Helton
  2. Larry Walker
  3. Troy Tulowitzki
  4. Carlos Gonzalez
  5. Nolan Aranedo
As always, we look forward to your feedback and look for us to unveil a new top 50 soon.
Ah, the road to the Class of 2018 is officially underway as the Baseball Hall of Fame ballot has been released with 33 candidates who are on the ballot.

The candidates in alphabetical are:

Barry Bonds: Bonds is on his sixth ballot and enjoyed his biggest jump last year with a 53.8% finish. That increase gives a lot of hope to the PED associated players for Hall of Fame entry. He is ranked # 2 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Chris Carpenter: Carpenter is on his first ballot and the former Starting Pitcher went 144 and 94 and won the Cy Young Award in 2005. He was also a three time All Star.

Roger Clemens: Like Bonds, Clemens enjoyed a significant increase in his vote tally moving up to 54.1%. If the seven time Cy Young Award winner enjoys another gain in his sixth year on the ballot we could see him inducted before his time on the ballot ends. He is ranked #1C on Notinhalloffame.com.

Johnny Damon: Damon is on his first ballot and will struggle to make a second. He was a two time All Star and a two time World Series Champion. He is ranked #99 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Vladimir Guerrero: Guerrero is on his second year of eligibility and came off a 71.7% result. The 2004 American League MVP likely we will see enough of a rise to gain entry to Cooperstown. He is ranked #9 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Livan Hernandez: A two time All Star, Livan Hernandez had a career record of 178 and 177. This is his first time on the ballot

Trevor Hoffman: Hoffman was only one percentage point away from Cooperstown last year, thus only a marginal increase in his third year of eligibility should get him in. His 601 career Saves puts him second all-time and he is also a seven time All Star. He is ranked #20 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Orlando Hudson: Making his first appearance on the ballot, Hudson would go to two All Star Games and was a four time Gold Glove winner.

Aubrey Huff: Huff would accumulate 1,699 Hits and 242 Home Runs over his career. He is also a two time World Series Champion with the San Francisco Giants.

Jason Isringhausen: Isringhausen is also on his first year of eligibility and he was a two time All Star.

Andruw Jones: Jones is entering his first year of eligibility and brings a decent resume with eight All Star Games, ten Gold Gloves and 434 career Home Runs. He is ranked #47 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Chipper Jones: The career Atlanta Brave is debuting on the ballot and is the most likely newly eligible former player to get inducted immediately. Jones was the National League MVP in 1999 and is an eight time All Star. He won the Batting Title in 2008. He is ranked #3 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jeff Kent: Kent is on his fifth year of eligibility and finished with 16.7% of the vote last year, his highest to date. The Third Baseman was the 2000 National League MVP and was a five time All Star. He is ranked #50 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Carlos Lee: Lee is making his first appearance on the ballot and was a two time All Star. He hit 358 Home Runs with 2,273 Hits.

Brad Lidge: The former Relief Pitcher recorded 225 Saves and was a two time All Star. He was also a World Series Champion with Philadelphia and he is entering his first year on the ballot.

Edgar Martinez: The former Designated Hitter is on his ninth try but his 58.6% gives him hope to possibly get in as it was a 15.2% increase from the previous vote. He is ranked #17 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Hideki Matsui: “Godzilla” was a two time All Star with the New York Yankees and was the 2009 World Series MVP.

Fred McGriff: It is not looking good for Fred McGriff who is on his ninth year of eligibility following a 21.7% vote tally last year. McGriff is a five time All Star with 493 career Home Runs. He is ranked #33 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Kevin Millwood: An All Star in 1999, Kevin Millwood is on the ballot for the first time. He went 169 and 152 with 2,083 Strikeouts.

Jamie Moyer: Playing almost to age of 50, Jamie Moyer makes his Hall of Fame ballot debut. Moyer was an All Star once and retired with a record of 269 and 209 with 2,441 Strikeouts. He is ranked #105 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Mike Mussina: Mussina is on his fifth year of eligibility and finished with a high of 51.8% of the vote. Mussina retired with 270 Wins against only 153 Losses. He would be named to five All Star Games. He is ranked #4 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Manny Ramirez: Manny debuted last year with only 23.8% of the ballot but the two time World Series Champion and 500 Home Run Club member should see an increase this year. He is ranked #7 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Scott Rolen: Rolen will be one of the most hotly debated new arrivals to the ballot as his sabremetric numbers far exceed his traditional ones. Still, this is a seven time All Star with a World Series Ring. He is ranked #17 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Johan Santana: Santana was a two time Cy Young Award winner and four time All Star. He is making his first appearance on the ballot. He is ranked #65 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Curt Schilling: Unlike many others who were on the ballot previously, Schilling actually trended downwards mostly due to his comments against the media finishing with 45% last year as opposed to the 52.3% he had the year before. Schilling is a three time Cy Young runner-up, two time World Series winner and a six time All Star. He is ranked #8 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Gary Sheffield: Sheffield is on his fourth year of eligibility and received 13.3% of the vote last year. He has 509 career Home Runs with nine All Star Game appearances. He is ranked #21 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Sammy Sosa: Sosa is entering his sixth year on the ballot following an 8.6% vote total. That is concerning as he has only finished in double digits on his first year of eligibility. He is ranked #30 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Jim Thome: Thome is on the ballot for the first time and brings five All Star Games and 612 Home Runs for consideration. He will likely get in but possibly not on his first try. He is ranked #6 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Omar Vizquel: Vizquel is also entering his first year of eligibility and the defensive specialist should receive enough ballots to remain on future ballots. He is ranked #76 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Billy Wagner: The seven time All Star is entering his third year on the ballot and he received 10.2% on the ballot last year.

Larry Walker: The 1997 National League MVP is running out of time. He is on his eight year of eligibility and he finished 21.9% last year. He is ranked #15 on Notinhalloffame.com.

Kerry Wood: The former flamethrower is on his first year of eligibility. Wood was a two time All Star and was the 1998 NL Rookie of the Year.

Carlos Zambrano: On his first year of eligibility, Zambrano was a three time All Star who finished with a career record of 132 and 91.

Not everyone who was Hall of Fame eligible for the first time made the ballot. This includes Miguel Batista,Francisco Cordero, Brian Fuentes, Adam Kennedy, Guillermo Mota, Carl Pavano, Scott Podsednik, J.C. Romero, Ben Sheets, Jeff Suppan and Jack Wilson.

As always, we here at Notinhalloffame.com will be very interested to see what will transpire with this latest ballot and we will love watching all of the debates begin!
Strategic voting. What you have to do when you have too many choices and not enough time or opportunities to realize all those choices.

Sounds like voting for the Baseball Hall of Fame for the last few years, doesn't it?

The good news is that since the Shutout of 2013, when the eligible members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) could not muster the 75 percent of the vote necessary to elect any one ballot candidate to the Hall of Fame despite a wealth of candidates from whom to choose (I counted 14), the BBWAA has sent a dozen players to Cooperstown. Based on that trend, and barring any unusual or unforeseen wrinkle, the writers are certain to elect at least one player for 2018.

15. Larry Walker

Entries on this list discuss the plight of Relief Pitchers.  Others discuss the merits of those who were accused of taking Performance Enhancing drugs.  With Larry Walker, the question will be to what extent playing in Coors Field did to pad his statistics.